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Results below are from employers in these industries: Health Care

They are talking about these topics: Current Continuing Education, Educational Partnerships, Experience & Credentials, General Skills, Industry Trends, Needs & Challenges in Continuing Education, Occupation-Specific Skills, Workforce Trends & Challenges

 

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Industry
Health Care

Topic
Current Continuing Education
Educational Partnerships
Experience & Credentials
General Skills
Industry Trends
Needs & Challenges in Continuing Education
Occupation-Specific Skills
Workforce Trends & Challenges


Industry Topic Sort descending Issue What did
employers say?
Health Care Current Continuing Education Current incumbent training topics include new technology, computer skills, electronic medical records, and diversity. Employers have also sent employees for specialist training. Recertification is a large portion of incumbent continuing education as well. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Current Continuing Education For current training, employers tend to prefer hiring external trainers. Some employers also use simulators or internal mentorship programs. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Educational Partnerships Schools need to continue recruiting students into the health care field, particularly for long-term care positions, CNAs, LPNs, and PAs. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Educational Partnerships Employers express concern that many K-12 students do not adequately understand career options in the health care field. They believe there is a need for higher education and businesses to support the K-12 system in improving career counseling efforts. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Educational Partnerships When discussing the importance of clinical experience, employers state there needs to be improvements in clinicals, such as more communication between the educational institutions and the clinical agencies where students are being placed; more consideration of how many students clinics can realistically take; and more research into funding sources and fellowships for nursing students (especially students who are specializing). They would also like to see more long-term care placements. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Educational Partnerships Employers express concern about accreditation changes and the possibility that LPN programs may disappear altogether. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Educational Partnerships Other program improvement suggestions include having more hands-on training at the beginning of the program; providing the option of a financial track; standardizing CNA requirements; and working with non-traditional students on career development. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Educational Partnerships Because there is a concern about a nursing faculty shortage, respondents suggest that MnSCU target nursing students with an aptitude for teaching in order to recruit them into nursing education. They also suggest that faculty divide their time between working in the field and teaching. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Educational Partnerships Respondents suggest curricular improvements such as more coursework on patient communication (including critical conversations before clinical and interwoven with clinical practice), gerontology, molecular, ICD-10 coding, professionalism, using simulations, and project management. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Experience & Credentials There is a trend in acute-care settings to hire bachelor-level registered nurses (RNs). Long-term care is more flexible in hiring bachelor- or associate-level RNs and relies more heavily on licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and nursing assistants. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Experience & Credentials Employers expect to do on-the-job training for new hires to reinforce educational training. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Experience & Credentials Employers seek candidates who have had previous job and/or volunteer experience. Ideally, this experience would be in the health care field, but other experiences are valuable, too. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care General Skills Students need to be trained on the financial aspects of health care to better understand reimbursement and how their health care decisions will financially impact the system. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care General Skills All employees need strong multitasking and time-management abilities as workloads and/or caseloads increase. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care General Skills Employers say candidates need more training in basic job application and interviewing skills. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care General Skills Health care professionals synthesize and analyze complex information. Therefore, analytical and problem-solving skills are extremely important. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care General Skills Nurses are often required to assume management and supervisory roles as they enter the field. This is difficult for new hires that lack leadership training. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care General Skills Employers look for candidates who are able to hold themselves accountable, are adaptable and have a strong work ethic. Some employers feel that professionalism is lacking in new hires, and some suggest this is due to generational differences. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care General Skills Many employers feel that an increasing number of students are entering nursing due to high salaries or an interest in technology (as opposed to the primary goal of helping people). Employers feel such workers do not exhibit the expected level of care for patients and their families. Therefore, entry-level hires need stronger skills in patient care and communication. This includes increasing their ability to be hospitable, advocate for patients, anticipate needs, resolve conflict and communicate effectively. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care General Skills As health care moves toward a more team-oriented approach, employees need to be able to communicate effectively with other professionals, such as doctors, nurses, and social workers. Interpersonal communication and conflict resolution are frequently cited as crucial skills that are often lacking in new hires. Some employers attribute this to the younger generation having less experience with face-to-face communication. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Industry Trends With an aging population, there is a greater demand for geriatric, palliative, and hospice care. The need for more chronic disease management is also encouraging a shift to preventative care and self-accountability for health behaviors that lead to chronic disease. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Industry Trends The roles of health care professionals are changing as the health care industry moves from an acute care model to a community care model. Nurses will be working 'at the top of their degree' and taking on new roles with the possible development of new supporting occupations. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Industry Trends Employees constantly need to adapt to rapidly changing technology, including medical devices and electronic medical records. For this reason, the need for IT skills has increased. Technology is also changing the delivery of care, and many employers predict a movement to telemedicine and electronic visits, also known as e-visits. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Industry Trends Financial cuts are a prominent challenge in the health care industry. Many speak of having "to do more with less." Reimbursements for long-term care are being cut while demands for care are growing. Workloads are increasing with a push toward greater efficiency. The need to hire is not always matched with the financial capacity to hire. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Needs & Challenges in Continuing Education Incumbents need additional training in soft skills areas, such as leadership, supervision, interpersonal communication, cross-generational communication, adaptation, customer service, and goal-setting. Additional training is also needed to enhance technical skills. This includes topics such as basic computer programs and technology, electronic medical records, dementia care, and ER care. Additional refresher courses are also needed for nurses re-entering the workforce. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Needs & Challenges in Continuing Education Employers emphasize the importance of short-term and in-house training due to cost and time constraints. Some employers suggested a two- or three-day training camp with certification; an option of taking a practice test to ensure recertification; and more simulation training. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Occupation-Specific Skills There is a need for training in electronic medical records, basic computer literacy, and other medical technology. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Occupation-Specific Skills Cultural sensitivity and awareness training are increasingly important. This may include language training and generational training as well. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Occupation-Specific Skills There is a need for more training and experience in geriatric care to work with the aging population and in long-term facilities. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Occupation-Specific Skills Employers note that new hires are able to diagnose separate conditions, but have difficulty synthesizing multiple morbidities. Employers expect that new hires possess strong clinical skills to deal more appropriately with multiple morbidities. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Workforce Trends & Challenges Advanced Practice and Specialties: There is growing demand for nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs). Rural facilities, in particular, have difficulty recruiting an adequate number of NPs and PAs. There is also a growing need for specialty RNs, such as those specializing in diabetic and neonatal care. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Workforce Trends & Challenges Lab Tech: Laboratory employers are seeing similar workforce needs for technologists as nursing professions. Among the various comments, many say that technologists are playing a more prominent role in the health care team, requiring stronger soft skills. Some employers experienced a shortage of technologists while others did not. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Workforce Trends & Challenges Long-Term Care: Long-term care facilities, in particular, have difficulty attracting and retaining health care professionals. Because long-term facilities are not reimbursed at the same rates as hospitals, they cannot always provide competitive compensation. Additionally, the image of long-term care is generally seen as less "glamorous" than other health care environments. Employers need more health care professionals who are dedicated to a career in geriatric care and/or in nursing home facilities. Students also need a greater understanding of the nursing home model, which includes the social model of aging in addition to the medical model of aging. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Workforce Trends & Challenges Licensed Practical Nurse Shortage: Many employers struggle to fill the huge demand for LPNs. This is especially true in long-term facilities. There is high turnover in LPN positions because a large number quickly pursue an RN degree and then move to other positions. Additionally, many LPNs assume leadership positions—rather than hands-on positions—within long-term care facilities. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Workforce Trends & Challenges Several respondents are very positive about the quality of applicants that have seen recently. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Workforce Trends & Challenges Retention: Employers face high rates of turnover for LPNs, certified nursing assistants (CNAs), and RNs. This is particularly challenging for employers in Greater Minnesota; they find it challenging to attract qualified nurses because they cannot always offer salaries that are competitive with the salaries offered in the Twin Cities. Additionally, as mentioned above, many LPNs and CNAs become RNs for career advancement opportunities. This creates a constant shortage in LPN and CNA positions. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Workforce Trends & Challenges Retirement: Many nurses are approaching retirement age, but are delaying retirement. This makes it difficult for employers to strategically hire and train new employees in preparation for a wave of retirements. This, too, fuels concern about an increase in shortages of experienced workers. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Workforce Trends & Challenges Future skills needed include the ability to work with geriatric populations with complex conditions and multiple diagnoses. Technological and IT skills, including patient care through telemedicine, will also be very important. Others mention leadership skills and more RNs in long-term care. For lab techs, they predict the need for more advanced training and molecular understanding. Read what employers said about this issue
Health Care Workforce Trends & Challenges General Workforce Shortage: Many employers are having difficulty filling positions, particularly for LPNs, advanced practice and specialty, and clinical lab careers. Read what employers said about this issue